Appendix III

TO

The Streetcars of New Orleans, Louis C. Hennick and E. Harper Charlton, Gretna, La. 1975 (2nd printing of Louisiana, Its Street and Interurban Railways, Vol. II, Louis C. Hennick and E. Harper Charlton, New Orleans, La. 1965, Louis C. Hennick, Publisher).

Containing New Research

Revising

Chapter 4, “Equipment” pp. 105-188 of the 1975 edition.  All pp. cited in Appendix III are taken from the 1975 edition.  New research includes photos and data not published in that edition as well as correction of errors.

Table of Contents


Introduction

Most new research came from “Louisiana Collections” of photographs, mms and microfilm files located at the following institutions:

Earl K. Long Library, University of New Orleans
Howard-Tilton Library, Tulane University
Louisiana State University Library, Baton Rouge
Public Library, City of New Orleans
Louisiana State Museum, Baton Rouge and New Orleans Branches
New Orleans Notarial Archives

The most extensive collection of streetcar photographs, mms and other relevant materials, such as printed memorabilia, is located at The Historic New Orleans Collection (the authors' collections are there).  THNOC is constantly increasing its holdings by accepting donations of new materials or purchasing them.

The N. O. Public Library maintains a comparable photo collection and houses extensive collection of records from the New Orleans Public Service Inc. dating from the 1920s and 1930s.  Also there is a compilation of newspaper references to streetcar operations in New Orleans, 1866-1926 (mainly from N. O. Daily Picayune and N. O. Times-Picayune) donated by E. Weber in 1992.  Another great assistance is the 2004 mms by Earl W. Hampton, Jr., with the assistance of Ken Hall, which covers the streetcar developments in New Orleans since 1964.

The most complete accumulation of newspaper microfilm is at Louisiana State University Library at Baton Rouge.  Howard Tilton Library has a collection practically the same size.  For individual newspaper editions missing from microfilm reels, the N. O. branch of the State Museum has many “loose” copies from the 1830-1861 period.  The U. S. Government Patents Office and the Government Documents Sections of LSU Baton Rouge and Howard-Tilton Library have useful materials concerning equipment development.  The Library of Congress has the most complete collection of trade journals.  The National Archives offer an incredible source for old illustrations and photographs.  I extend my thanks and appreciation to all the kind people of these institutions for their assistance, without which this appendix would not have been possible, and in this category I include the following historians and photographers:

Gary R. Altschuler, Allan H. Berner, Edward M. Blossom, Dr. Harold E. Cox, Robert S. Crockett, Alden H. Dreyer, E. Everett Edwards, Edward Francis, Otto A. Goessl, Tom Gray, James Guilbeau, William Harry, William Howes (Railway and Locomotive Historical Society Archivist), George N. Johnson, Jr., LeRoy O. King, Jr., Shelden S. King, George Krambles, Will Keller, Dr. Arthur Krim, Jerome Lachaussee, Gordon E. Lloyd, Frederick J. Maloney, Mark D. Meyer, Fred Mobley, Dr. Don Mueller, E. G. Rattley, Felix E. Reifschneider, Dick Rumboltz, Louis R. Saillard, Fred W. Schneider III, C. L. “Chick” Siebert, Jr., John R. Stevens, Dr. Jack Stewart and his gracious mother and father, Rod Varney, W. D. Volkmer, Wilbur C. Whittaker, V. C. Wilkins, D. C. Wornom, George H. Yater, Eric Zabilka.

Shreveport, Louisiana Without my number one son Michael's
encouragement, assistance and patience,
this work would not have happened.
August 12, 2005
Dedicated
to
Mr. E. Harper Charlton who championed
New Orleans and its traction history
all his days
Louis C. Hennick

Copyright © 2008, 2014, 2015, 2016 Louis C. Hennick.  All rights reserved.

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